Recommended Readings

ICLRD Briefing Papers

Good Planning Key to Future Success No 1 – November 2009

The paper by Rob Kitchin and Alastair Adair on Good Planning Key to Future Success argues that the opportunity for a long term, sustainable recovery is greatly increased through strategically aware and robust planning systems. This means, on the one hand reform of the planning systems and on the other the implementation of the NSS and RDS and investment in sectoral and spatial planning initiatives.

Linking Spatial Planning with Public Investment: Perspectives from the Island of Ireland – No 2 December 2009

The paper by David Counsell and Greg Lloyd on Linking Spatial Planning with Public Investment: Perspectives from the Island of Ireland explores the relationships between spatial planning and public investment on the island of Ireland, comparing the different approaches in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, identifying key challenges for the two governments and drawing lessons for the future.

Other Recommendations

At the Fourth ICLRD Annual Conference in Letterkenny presentations were made by senior planning officials, academics and practitioners on regional planning initiatives in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Wales, Scotland, England and Maryland in the United States.  Two recent publications follow these same initiatives in more depth.

Growth With Priority Funding Areas: A Good Idea Whose Time Has Yet to Come in the Journal of the American Planning Association is co-authored by Gerrit-Jan Knaap who presented at the ICLRD conference.  A new book, The New Spatial Planning Territorial Management with Soft Spaces and Fuzzy Boundaries covers many of the same topics including: Irish spatial planning and the Cork experience, spatial planning in Northern Ireland and the North West region, planning in a devolved Scotland, policy integration in Wales and the English planning system and the Leeds city region.

Growth With Priority Funding Areas: A Good Idea Whose Time Has Yet to Come Rebecca Lewis; Gerrit-Jan Knaap; Jungyul Sohn. Journal of the American Planning Association, 75:4,457–478

Gerrit Knapp from the National Center for Smart Growth and Education at the University Of Maryland and two other co-authors have written an article in the September 2009 Journal of the American Planning Association that expands on his presentation at the ICLRD conference. The article focus on lessons to be learned from the 12 year experience of trying to manage growth by targeting investments into priority development areas in Maryland.  This is directly relevant to policy initiatives under the National Spatial Strategy (NSS) and the National Development Plan (NDP) in the Republic of Ireland and the Regional Development Strategy (RDS) and Investment Strategy in Northern Ireland.

The article is available for free, please follow the link above for the article and the abstract. Please let us know if the link to Routhedge site  is no longer available and we help you find the article.

The New Spatial Planning Territorial Management with Soft Spaces and Fuzzy Boundaries by Graham Haughton, Philip Allmendinger, David Counsell, Geoff Vigar. Published by: Routledge, November 2009

About the Book (From the Routledge website)

Spatial planning, strongly advocated by government and the profession, is intended to be more holistic, more strategic, more inclusive, more integrative and more attuned to sustainable development than previous approaches. In what the authors refer to as the New Spatial Planning, there is a fairly rapidly evolving maturity and sophistication in how strategies are developed and produced. Crucially, the authors argue that the reworked boundaries of spatial planning means that to understand it we need to look as much outside the formal system of practices of ‘planning’ as within it.

The book takes a critical look at recent practices to see whether the new spatial planning is having the kinds of impacts its advocates would wish. Contributing to theoretical debates in planning, state restructuring and governance, it also outlines and critiques the contemporary practice of spatial planning. The authors cover the following topics:

  • The New Spatial Planning: Territorial Management and Devolution
  • Rethinking Planning: State Restructuring, Devolution and Spatial Strategies
  • Irish Spatial Planning and the Cork Experience
  • Spatial Planning in Northern Ireland and the Emergent North West Region of Ireland
  • Spatial Planning in a Devolved Scotland
  • The Wales Spatial Plan and Improving Policy Integration
  • English Spatial Planning and Dealing with Growth in the Leeds City Region
  • Congested Governance and the London Thames Gateway
  • A New Spatial Planning?